Sally Bosco

Author of Dark Fiction

Book Review: Hot off the Press by Meline Nadeau

Romance that weaves a spell and makes you think.

When Leigh Cameron goes back to her hometown of Watford Maine to attend her father’s funeral, she doesn’t expect to inherit his small-town newspaper. She also doesn’t expect to fall for her father’s protégé, the hot and handsome, David Stone. David resents her being there, and she really wants to sell the paper and go back to her Arts and Entertainment job at a big paper in New York. But as she gets more and more enmeshed in life in the small town, she begins to think she might want to stay.

I can’t say enough good about this book. Meline Nadeau weaves a spell around the reader that starts at page one and doesn’t quit until the end. It has everything a romance should have without the irritating things a lot of romances do have.

Meline Nadeau

The characters are well-drawn and multi-dimensional to the point that we truly care about them. Leigh is a high-spirited, kick ass heroine who’s witty and can hold her own in any conversation. David is strong and determined with a sensitive side. His background as a poor, native American, son of a prisoner makes us admire and like him for of the rough beginnings he was able to overcome. Minor characters that could have easily become stereotyped, such as the mean stepmother and gay best friend, come to life as individuals.

Nadeau builds the tension between Leigh and David so masterfully that by the time the sex scenes happen we’re really ready for them. The romance and chemistry between the characters is tense and engaging, and their erotic encounters are that much hotter for the emotional relationship between them.

The plot is well-constructed and believable. Events that happen at the end were foreshadowed in the beginning, leading to a satisfying resolution. There was suspense, not only in the relationship between the characters, but in the interesting and tense sub-plot of the Native American uprising at the local prison.

In some romances, the devices that keep the male and female protagonists apart can seem silly and contrived, but in Stop the Presses, the reasons seem real and natural, not forced.

Meline Nadeau draws a locale so picturesque and warmhearted it makes me want to visit Watford, Maine. The descriptions of the settings are so vivid, the town becomes a character in the book.

Her style is easy and natural, her words rhythmic, her dialogue witty and smart. She’s able to evoke genuine emotion through her writing.

For a fun, feel-good read, there’s nothing better. I can’t wait to read more of her books.

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